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Endangered sea cows, modern hotels and desert adventures welcome you to Dubai.

Diving in Dubai

Quick facts

Dubai being a seaport is littered with self-contained ecosystems in the wrecks of the Persian Gulf. Some are depths that only technical divers are qualified for but, for the most part, a portion of the wreck, the MV Dara is accessible to advanced divers.

In the Gulf of Oman, Fujairah is a favorite site featuring warm water, bleached sand and tropical fish. Sharm rock and Martini rock are pinnacles in the area that are a natural aquarium for marine species. The pinnacles are adorned with pink and purple corals.

Depths for these landmarks start at 20ft (5m) and descend to over 160ft (50m) and the water temperature varies from 75°F (22°C) in the winter months to 91°F (33°C) in the summer months when a wetsuit is definitely optional.

When to go

Rain and temperature

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Water temperature

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What to see

Over 500 species of fish reside in the waters surrounding Dubai as well as the second largest colony of endangered sea cow or ‘dugong’ in the world. Sandy pearl beds are gathering places for barracudas, manta rays, turtles and sea snakes whilst batfish and Arabian angelfish circle the bows and sterns of the majestic wrecks.

During the months of October to April, sailfish make their seasonal appearance in these waters.

Calendar

For better readability of the table, pass into the landscape mode.

Most likely sightingsPossible sightings

Area

The most populated city of the UAE and the business center of the Middle East, situated on the Persian Gulf, Dubai is an up and coming destination for corporate types as well as those in search of a break. Ancient and modern attractions entice visitors to come and explore this exotic lifestyle.

The city’s history dates back to a pre-oil era when pearl exports were the basis for the economy in Dubai in the 1930’s. Oil was discovered in the waters marginally off-shore in 1966 and thus launching Dubai into the world’s largest traded commodity market. The population, as a result, grew 300% in 7 years with the influx of foreigners working for international corporations.

The desert city is bordered by Oman, the salt pans and the ocean and resides in the middle of the Arabian desert which is scattered with date palms and the occasional Arabian oryx. Sporting temperatures of 106°F (41°C) in months like August, divers welcome the opportunity to get into the water.

Other attractions

Dubai’s range of activities is centered around the water and the desert. Fishing, sailing and dinner cruises help tourists enjoy their time above the water, yet on it. Dune bashing your way across the desert can be accomplished in a 4x4 buggy, quad bike or sandboard. For a taste of the real Middle East, you can watch camel races on a Thursday and Friday night in the winter months or catch a hot air balloon to get a bird’s eye view of it all. But it goes without saying, that the shopping is not to be scoffed at or passed over, and one day set aside for the malls may not be enough to satisfy your appetite.

Getting there

It is simple and painless getting to Dubai as long as you don’t hold an Israeli passport and you are not coming from India or Pakistan. The airlines that service the UAE are some of the best in the market and flights are readily available from all international airports around the globe. Public transport comes in the well-serviced form of a bus, tram and monorail.

UTC+04:00

Time zone

AED

Currency

+971

Calling code

230 V

Electric volt

G

Plug type

DBX

Main airport
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