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Diving in Mozambique

From the windswept mountains to the crystal sea, Mozambique offers travelers the opportunity to both summit peaks and dive with whale sharks, all in the same day.

Diving in Mozambique

Quick facts

Mention Mozambique and most scuba divers immediately think megafauna. Whale sharks and manta rays prowl the plankton rich water year round and humpback whales pass by on their way through the Mozambique Channel from the Antarctic. Mozambique, located on Africa’s southeast coast, has more than 2000 kilometres/1250 miles of coastline bathed by the southerly flowing Aghulhas Current. To the north, the Quirimbas Archipelago is home to the recently designated Primeiras and Segundas Marine Protected Area (MPA). The largest MPA on the African continent, it protects rich coral reefs and mangrove forests and is an important nursery for myriad reef fish and five of the ocean’s seven marine turtles among other notable denizens. To the south, the Maputo Protection Area spans the coast from Ponta de Ouro to the Maputo River providing a haven for nesting marine turtles and conserving the offshore reef ecosystems. Off Praia do Tofo, Inhambane, whale shark alley (a plankton rich current fed corridor) attracts whale sharks all year round. Sightings are almost guaranteed. This alone will put Mozambique on many scuba divers’ bucket lists.

Recommended training

Take the AWARE - Fish Identification course to help identify local marine life. The PADI Digital Underwater Photographer course is also great to record your adventure.

When to go

This tropical climate has sunny days and fresh evenings all year round. The dry season runs from April to late December and the summer season goes from late December to March. Summer season is hotter with higher humidity and occasional short intense showers, usually at night. Daytime temperatures vary from 22-32°C/72-90°F.

Rain and temperature

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Water temperature

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Where to dive

  • Inhambane & Tofo

    Go the distance to Inhambane and Tofo in Mozambique and be rewarded with the presence of stunning marine megafauna like whale sharks and manta rays.

  • Pemba

    With some of the most highly acclaimed scuba diving around, Pemba Island will astound you with the rich diversity that abounds both on land and beneath the sea.

USD 1,930Per trip
USD 2,468Per trip
USD 2,650Per trip
Doodles, Ponta do Ouro – This is a long, interesting reef, with small drop-offs and sand patches. Schools of juvenile reef fish, shrimp, snappers, boxfish and turtles call the colorful hard and soft corals home. You often share the reef with friendly potato bass, which can reach a length of 2 metres/6.5 feet and can weigh as much as 110 kilograms/240 pounds. Game fish and dolphin are sometimes also sighted. Pinnacles, Ponta do Ouro – This deep reef is known for Zambezi and hammerhead shark sightings. Big potato bass patrol the waters and formations of rays floating past are not uncommon. Thick coral formations hide eels and reef fish, and various game fish species are almost always in attendance, prowling the frequently strong current on the lookout for their next meal. The Gap, Pemba – This spectacular wall dive is located on the edge of the continental shelf on a drop-off of that plunges to 80-120 metres/260-390 feet. It’s a prolific feeding ground for big game fish. The dive starts at around 10 metres/33 feet and features dramatic structures adorned with large gorgonian fans at about 37 metres/120 feet. Sunfish and devil ray encounters are a real possibility here. Edge of Reason, Medjumbe Island – According to the charts, this drop-off goes straight down to more than 850 metres/2750 feet – obviously well past recreational scuba depths. Overhangs and caverns at 20-30 metres/70-100 feet harbor species such as humphead wrasse, groupers, reef sharks, snappers and unicorn fish. The dive site gets its name from the sensations that flood you as the wall plummets to the deep blue. Kingfisher Reef, Inhambane – There are many dives sites on this reef off Praia de Jangamo. The reefs offer a huge diversity of marine life, including lots of tropical fish species and numerous giant manta rays visiting cleaning stations. Manta Reef, Tofo – This is the area’s showcase dive site, famous for a couple of manta cleaning stations. It’s a gentle drift dive that begins with a descent into 26 metres/85 feet of water in the middle of a small amphitheater teeming with life. The first cleaning station is reached in a shallower sandy area at 21 metres/70 feet. Here, mantas circle overhead to be cleaned by goldies, cleaner wrasse and butterflyfish. In good visibility it’s possible to watch upwards of ten mantas circling overhead.

What to see

During a dive in Mozambique you have a great chance to come across huge creatures like whale sharks, manta rays, and humpback whales. Look a little closer, and you will see bountiful reef fish and unique marine life. Five of the world’s seven species of turtles frequent Mozambique, and the rich currents filter in tons of nutrients and plankton to feed this bustling ecosystem.


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Officially the Republic of Mozambique, this large country in Southern Africa is aligned along the Mozambique Channel, which lies between Mozambique and the island of Madagascar. Warm and tropical, Mozambique boasts a vast range of ecosystems and climates. Lakes and rivers crisscross the nation, creating a vibrant and fertile environment.

Once colonized by the Portuguese, Mozambique gained its independence in 1975, and it was able to make use of its vast, rich natural resources. However, the first years after independence were rocky, at best; the country torn by civil war for fifteen long years. However, today the country is flourishing, and the tourism industry has taken off, leading to more infrastructure for divers and tourists, alike.

Other attractions

Shop in the local markets and explore the old, colonial streets. There are excellent museums to discover, as well as many structures of historical significance. Be sure to take a day trip to go fishing or snorkeling on some of the many islands that dot Mozambique’s border.

Getting there

Flying in to Mozambique is probably your best bet, if you are visiting from afar. Maputo International is the main hub for international flights. Beira, Pemba, Vilankulu and Inhambane Airports also receive international flights.


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