< Back

Contact us

Our scuba travel experts are available 24/7 to assist you in planning and booking a fantastic scuba diving vacation

Diving in Norway

Diving in Norway

Quick facts

Drift diving is a rip. There isn’t much you can do to compete with the sheer exhilaration of “flying” over the sea floor borne only by the current. Saltstraumen, about 10 kilometres/six miles from the town of Bodø, Norway, boasts some of the strongest tidal currents in the world, and for those in the know diving here is off the charts. The currents here can exceed eight knots and, at times, the difference in water height between the fjord and the ocean can be as much as one metre/three feet. All that water barrels through a three-kilometre/two-mile strait that’s only 150 metres/490 feet wide. The massive movement of oxygen-rich water attracts a wide range of marine flora and fauna; the place is a haven for underwater imagemakers as it’s home to some massive coalfish. The strong currents make for rewarding, but demanding, dive conditions. This is a place with sites suitable for divers of all levels and visibility is excellent, reaching 60 metres/200 feet at times, but expert advice is crucial and the local PADI Pros will match the dive to your abilities, desires and experience.

When to go

Rain and temperature

Click to expand

Water temperature

Click to expand
USD 3Per trip
USD 3,900Per trip
USD 3,930Per trip

What to see

Norwegian Krone
GMT +1
Temperate along the coast, colder interior.
Diving season:
12 months
Water temperature:
Winter 4C (39F)
Summer 13C (55F)
Air temperature:
Winter -5C (23F) - Oslo
Summer 18C (64F) - Oslo
Winter 1C (34F) - Bergen
Summer 15C (59F) - Bergen


For better readability of the table, pass into the landscape mode.

Most likely sightingsPossible sightings


Norway is a country in Northern Europe that occupies the western portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula.

During three summer months, the sun never sets. In northern Norway, during the winter months, you have the opportunity to see the Northern Lights, which is nature's spectacular "light show".

The long coastline with its thousands of islands, deep fjords, wrecks and abundant marine life offer some of the best cold water diving in the World. Apart from diving, Norway offers many outdoor other activities including hiking, climbing and canoeing as well as year - round winter sports.

There are hundreds of wrecks along the Norwegian coastline, but probably one of the best wrecks is the Frankenwald which stands upright on a sandy bottom. The deck is located at a depth of 27 metres but the rear mast is the shallowest point at only 7 metres. This German steam ship which is 126 metres long struck a rocky outcrop on the 6 January 1940 in the Sognefjord. Also, at The Lofoten Isles (Vestfjorden) diving with Killer Whales can be an experience not to forget, as they feed on the shoals of Herrings.

The wrecks at Narvik include many WW2 warships and large freighters. More than 30 ships were sunk in the harbour during the two battles of 1940. In addition to this, 6 German, 1 Polish, and 3 British destroyers lie in the nearby fjords. A lot of these ships can be dived.

The German battleship Tirpitz was the less-famous sister ship to the Bismarck and the site of battleship is a popular dive, but is in a rather remote location, but purely because of it's history is a worthy dive.

Getting there

  • Frankenwald wreck
  • Diving with whales in the Lofoten Isles from May to September
  • The wrecks at Narvik
Live chat Call back